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Quantitative Biology > Cell Behavior

Title: Metabolomic signature of type 1 diabetes-induced sensory loss and nerve damage in diabetic neuropathy

Abstract: Diabetic-induced peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a diabetic late complication. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of nerve damage & sensory loss remain largely unclear. Recently, alterations in metabolic flux have gained attention a basis for organ damage in diabetes; however, peripheral sensory neurons have not been adequately analyzed. In the present study, we attempted to delineate the role of alteration of metabolic pathways in relation to nerve damage & sensory loss. We employed STZ-injected mouse model of type1 diabetes. To investigate the progression of DPN by behavioral measurements of sensitivity to thermal & mechanical stimuli and quantitative assessment of intraepidermal nerve fiber density. We employed a MS-based screen to address alterations in levels of metabolites in peripheral sciatic nerve (SN) & amino acids (AA) in serum over several months post-STZ administration. Although hyperglycemia & body weight changes occurred early, sensory loss & reduced intraepithelial branching of nociceptive nerves was only evident at 22 wks post-STZ. The longitudinal metabolites screen in SN demonstrated that mice at 12 and 22 wks post-STZ showed an early impairment the tricarboxylic acid. We found that levels of citric acid, ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid & malic acid were observed to be significantly reduced in SN at 22 wks post-STZ. In addition, we also found the increase in levels of sorbitol & L-Lactate in SN from 12 wks post-STZ injection. AA screen in serum showed that the amino acids Val, Ile and Leu, increased more than 2-fold from 12 wks post-STZ. Similarly, the levels of Tyr, Asn, Ser, His, Ala, & Pro showed progressive increase. Our results indicate that the impaired TCA cycle metabolites in peripheral nerve is the primary cause of shunting metabolic substrate to compensatory pathways which leads to mitochondrial dysfunction & nerve damage.
Comments: 17 pages, 3 figures
Subjects: Cell Behavior (q-bio.CB); Tissues and Organs (q-bio.TO)
Cite as: arXiv:1803.06740 [q-bio.CB]
  (or arXiv:1803.06740v1 [q-bio.CB] for this version)

Submission history

From: Nitin Agarwal [view email]
[v1] Sun, 18 Mar 2018 21:19:11 GMT (189kb)