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Physics > Applied Physics

Title: A new elliptical-beam method based on time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) to measure the in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity and its comparison with the beam-offset method

Abstract: Materials lacking in-plane symmetry are ubiquitous in a wide range of applications such as electronics, thermoelectrics, and high-temperature superconductors, in all of which the thermal properties of the materials play a critical part. However, very few experimental techniques can be used to measure in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity. A beam-offset method based on time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) was previously proposed to measure in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity. However, a detailed analysis of the beam-offset method is still lacking. Our analysis shows that uncertainties can be large if the laser spot size or the modulation frequency is not properly chosen. Here we propose an alternative approach based on TDTR to measure in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity using a highly elliptical pump (heating) beam. The highly elliptical pump beam induces a quasi-one-dimensional temperature profile on the sample surface that has a fast decay along the short axis of the pump beam. The detected TDTR signal is exclusively sensitive to the in-plane thermal conductivity along the short axis of the elliptical beam. By conducting TDTR measurements as a function of delay time with the rotation of the elliptical pump beam to different orientations, the in-plane thermal conductivity tensor of the sample can be determined. In this work, we first conduct detailed signal sensitivity analyses for both techniques and provide guidelines in determining the optimal experimental conditions. We then compare the two techniques under their optimal experimental conditions by measuring the in-plane thermal conductivity tensor of a ZnO [11-20] sample. The accuracy and limitations of both methods are discussed.
Comments: 35 pages, 12 figures, submitted to RSI
Subjects: Applied Physics (physics.app-ph)
Cite as: arXiv:1803.06551 [physics.app-ph]
  (or arXiv:1803.06551v1 [physics.app-ph] for this version)

Submission history

From: Puqing Jiang [view email]
[v1] Sat, 17 Mar 2018 18:32:16 GMT (2608kb)